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Book Review: A Game of Fate by Scarlett St. Clair


A Game of Fate by Scarlett St. Clair 
Series: Hades Saga, #1
Genre: Fantasy | Romance
Age Range: Adult
Format: Hardcover, 372 pages
Source: My Copy
Published on September 18, 2020e
Scarlett St. Clair: Website | Goodread
Might contain spoilers

Synopsis:
Hades, God of the Underworld, is known for his inflexible rule, luxurious night clubs, and impossible bargains. Use to control, he is not prepared to discover the Fates have chosen his future wife and Queen—Persephone, Goddess of Spring.

Despite her attraction to the god, Persephone, an ambitious journalism student, is determined to expose Hades for his cruel and ruthless ways.

Hades finds himself faced with the impossible—proving his future bride wrong. Despite his efforts, there are forces who wish to keep the two apart and Hades comes to realize he will do anything for his forbidden love, even defy Fate.


I don’t remember who recommended A Touch of Darkness for me but I had heard Persephone is very annoying character, so I decided to pick up the book in Hades’ point of view instead for that reason. I thought that if I’m not in Persephone’s head I must not get annoyed by her.

“Take her, and I will destroy this world. Take her, and I will destroy you. Tae her, and I will end us all.”

Hades is a lonely God who haven’t experienced love, ever. He doesn’t even think he deserves it but that doesn’t stop him from wanting Persephone when she accidentally makes a deal with him at Nevernight, one of his most popular New Athens Clubs.

I haven’t read A Touch of Darkness, so I might not understand her as well as people who actually read her book first but I pretty much couldn’t stand her. She’s a journalist, so of course I knew she couldn’t be trusted but her behavior all in all made me want to hit my head towards something. Demeter wanted to protect her by keeping her powers from manifesting (I guess he thought Hades could feel them somehow and know she exists?) and by making her codependent. This made Persephone act like a mortal and if she was an actual human I could’ve dealed with it but she isn’t. Persephone didn’t even really try to get to know Hades but got mad for littlest things and listened what other said about him, like Minthe and Aphrodite.

I think Hades was way too forgiving to Persephone and honestly I can’t figure out what he saw in her besides knowing that they were kind of meant to be. I gotta say the whole baking scene was cute.

I was more interested in Hade’s friendship with Hecate– and that’s just sad. Also I loved him with Cerbus, Typhon and Orthrus!

I didn’t really understand Minthe, our Nymph assistant. She believed Hades’ was hers for some reason and I think Hades wasn’t really acting like I would think Hades, God of Underworld would when a woman he slept once with causes drama between him and Persephone. He let her slide few times too much. But I didn’t think other Gods acted like I thought they would either. Like, Aphrodite didn’t believe in love and was acting like a spoiled brat instead when she didn’t get what she wanted.

Can someone explain me why Demeter had to beg for a daughter? She’s a goddess.

All in all I think I could’ve enjoyed A Game of Fate a lot more if the heroine wasn’t so unlikeable. I enjoyed the plot but it wasn’t that interesting. I wish I had got to see more of the gods and I’m glad I decided to read Hades’ point of view instead of hers. I haven’t decided yet if the series is worth continuing because of Persephone but I’ll at least give the author’s other work a chance. Who knows, maybe Persephone gets more likeable as we go on.

Rating
4.stars

4 thoughts on “Book Review: A Game of Fate by Scarlett St. Clair

  1. YAY for you finishing! I’m happy to see you enjoyed Hades POV! I agree with your thoughts 100% on Persephone and Demeter. If I could I would throw them all away and have Hades fall for someone else. If you do decide to continue the series, I hope it will be better for you than it was for me! ❤

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